What other people have been doing with peat

exhibitions of peat related things:

https://www.lisheencastle.com/visit-lough-boora-discovery-park/peat-train-and-sculpture/

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=peat+exhibition&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjktvvW2PfdAhWDN8AKHXzaDwEQ_AUIDigB&biw=1259&bih=656#imgrc=x0SQybrzSdOlrM:

peat stack and tractor in the exhibition:

http://lanntair.com/arts/moladh-na-moine-in-praise-of-peat/

Cast glass moulded from peat:

http://lanntair.com/arts/instinct-heritage-shaun-fraser/

http://shaunfraser.tumblr.com/archive

He has some screen printing. Based in the flow country, Sutherland. I think one of the largest peat bogs in Scotland.

Plaster models of peat slices:

http://hotsta.net/simon.kidd

Ceramic review article this month, note: he sledged his plaster into peat slices, much smaller and thinner than the ones I’ve been working on. I may have been faster sledging rather than casting my slice, but I wanted to get the proportions of a slice dug out with a tairsgeir.  The tool cuts a particular size, rectangular 50cm long. He has shaped the plaster more extremely than I have, I plan to shape/mark the clay with a tairsgeir once its slip cast, I’ve shaped the plaster but smoothed it to make mould making easier.

IMG_3036.jpg

I see he has a tairsgeir – he is Irish and it’s called a Slean, on the wall. I’m waiting on a price from the Ironmonger for mine.

I also see that he is using peat to make glaze – similar to what I am in the middle of doing. Burning it in the fire and collecting the ashes. Then I can sprinkle the ashes over a clear glaze and put it in a reduction firing in the large kiln. He has glazed some plates using the peat glaze, which appear green.  The article gives some technical information regarding peat ash glaze: (Ceramic review, pg 59, Issue 294, Nov/Dec 2018)

‘The turf consists mainly of dried and compressed spagnum moss. When burned, the carbon escapes as carbon dioxide gas and the minerals (including silica, alumina, potassium, calcium and iron) remain as ash. …..which gave a range of crystalline and sometimes crawled glazes in various tones from olive green to gold ochre.’

The article recommends washing, sieving and drying ‘wood ash’, I’m assuming peat ash would be treated the same way.

 

 

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