I pulled on my wellies yesterday and went out digging around for clay samples near Luss Loch Lomond. Its a significant area as it marks the Highland Boundary fault line – a geological structure which marks the boundary between highland and lowlands of Scotland. The lowland side, which is where the village of Luss lies has the younger, softer sedimentary rocks and the landscape was formed by glacial retreat.

A quick check of the geology of the area, trying to skim the surface, states that the rock type across the national park is metamorphic, which includes slate. The village was built for the workers in the nearby slate quarry.

I collected slate from the open slate quarry, on the hills outside the village:-

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The banks of the river near the slate quarry were too steep to scramble down to take samples, I had to take from nearer the village where the banks are shallow. There’s no path to follow the river upstream and it isn’t visible from the road that runs through Glen Luss.

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Mouth of the river Luss Water that flows into Loch Lomond at Luss:- banks were sand and shale, no clay so no sample taken, you can see the river joining the Loch in the second photo, sort of, it was a driech day

 

River bank level with the village, so a few thousand yards from the mouth of the river:- Sample taken, feels clay like. I waded to the middle of the river but it was sand and shale.

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There’s a burn/stream that flows into the river at the village, which flows down hill, with tributaries coming off the hills.

At village level the bed and banks were solid so no sample taken, it flows into Luss Water through a pipe and the river bed was sand at that point again no sample taken.

I followed the burn uphill above the village to Glen Luss, a few miles uphill where I took a sample at the point where a tributary flowed into it from the hill

Finally as I was following the burn I noticed shiny rocks so I took some samples of them

Then back to the village. You can just see Loch Lomond from the car.

I need to sieve the clay samples and decide what to do with the rocks.

I have lots of dried vegetation that I’ve collected – bluebells, dandelions, ferns, grasses, wild flowers etc, I could incorporated these.

 

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